Category Archives: Economic Development

Attracting & Retaining Immigrant Talent in Rural Areas – Free Webinar

The workforce population is shrinking as more and more baby-boomers retire. This will result in more pressure for communities to actively attract and retain immigrant talent. 

This webinar is designed to help rural employers and communities understand how to attract newcomers.

Details
Date: Thursday, April 6
Time: 12 pm – 1 pm
To register:
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/attracting-retaining-immigrant-talent-in-rural-areas

Continue reading Attracting & Retaining Immigrant Talent in Rural Areas – Free Webinar

Add Value to Your Agricultural Business: Learn How to Turn Your Ideas into Reality

Take the OMAFRA course, Exploring Value Added Opportunities, to learn whether adding value to your products and services is right for your business.  Register today for the March 31 workshop to be held in Sunderland, Ontario! Your registration fee includes resource materials, lunch and refreshments.

Ever wondered about turning your fruit into jam?  Ever dreamed about making gourmet ready-to-eat meals with your produce?

Take the Exploring Value Added Opportunities (EVAO) course to help you increase your profits through the creation of new products and services or value-added opportunities at your farm or food business. Our course can help you: Continue reading Add Value to Your Agricultural Business: Learn How to Turn Your Ideas into Reality

3 Lessons on Innovation from the Economic Developers Council of Ontario Annual Conference

I had the opportunity to attend the 60th annual Economic Developers Council of Ontario (EDCO) conference that took place in February. Delegates from across Ontario included economic development officers, municipal elected officials, staff from several Ontario ministries, and industry leaders representing manufacturing, business, planning, IT, and tourism.

The theme this year was Driven by Innovation. The following are my top three takeaways from the EDCO conference. Continue reading 3 Lessons on Innovation from the Economic Developers Council of Ontario Annual Conference

Analyst: Input-Output Modelling. A Closer Look.

Now that the the Input-Output Modelling tool, for Analyst, is available (read previous blog post here), it is time to take a closer look at one of the new reports, Regional Requirements.

Regional Requirements is just one of six new reports available in Analyst under the Input-Output Module. The report helps quantify the goods and services that a region requires from each industry, as well as the degree to which those requirements are met within the region.

This report can be used to perform comparative analysis of industries across the regions. It can answer questions like:

  • What value of purchases industries are making inside a region?
  • What value of purchases industries are making outside a region?
  • Where jobs are potentially leaking as a result?

This report gives the user two perspectives:

  • Region vs. Industry: what industry demands are being satisfied from within, and beyond the boundaries of a region?
  • The regional supply chain, in the broadest sense, is characterized by the industries within the region

Economic development officials can use this data to enhance their efforts accordingly.  This data can help identify and support:

  • What are all the industries in a region?
  • What industries are primarily using imports to service their needs?
  • Which industries may be able produce locally to reduce or substitute imports?
  • What jobs are need to for import substitution to be locally sustainable?

This report identifies where local demand is being sourced from and whether it is inside or outside the region.

First, identify the region(s) you want and click Run.

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A similar table to the one below will appear. Find what level of industry you need by changing the level of NAICS codes, and based on the level you can filter by that NAICS industry.

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Demand Met In-Region: amount spent on an industry by all business and population in the given region met within the regional economy

Demand Met by Imports: amount spent on an industry by all business and population in the given region met outside the regional economy

Clicking on any of the column titles will order the table in ascending/descending order to easily find the highest/lowest dollar amount or percentage.

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Moreover, selecting the Export button in the top right corner gives you the option to save your findings as an excel file.

One more blog post to come regarding Input-Output Modelling in Analyst.

For the meantime, check out this tutorial of how to navigate and use the Regional Requirements Report or click for more information on Analyst.

New Economic Modelling Tool

Analyst Input-Output Tool

The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs – in partnership with Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) – is excited to announce the addition of a Canadian version of their Input-Output Modelling tool in Analyst.

Input-Output models map out linkages within an economy by tracing the connections between industries, households and government. This is done by tracking the flow of money between those entities within a geographic area (for more background on input-output modelling). Continue reading New Economic Modelling Tool

Recent Business Retention & Expansion Project Reports

The Business Retention and Expansion (BR+E) program is a collaborative effort between government, community, and businesses that identifies opportunities to help businesses expand and, retain and create jobs. The program also encourages the implementation of agreed upon activities to achieve goals, and actions to improve the local business climate.

Three recent examples of completed BR+E projects are from the communities of:

  • Lake Country,
  • Orangeville, and;
  • Almaguin Highlands.

Each of these projects identified key opportunities that could help promote business expansion and increase growth for businesses. Continue reading Recent Business Retention & Expansion Project Reports

Thunder Bay and Area Food Strategy – Growing Local Economies from the Ground Up

In 2013, a new project—the Thunder Bay and Area Food Strategy—got off the ground in northern Ontario. Drawing inspiration from such trail blazing cities such as Vancouver and Toronto, the Food Strategy is intended as a comprehensive and action-oriented approach to building an economically robust, resilient, and equitable food system. The action plan is based on seven pillars of a healthy and sustainable food system, and was endorsed in 2014 by the City of Thunder Bay and 6 adjoining rural municipalities.

Continue reading Thunder Bay and Area Food Strategy – Growing Local Economies from the Ground Up

Key Takeaways: Teeny Tiny Southwest Summit

Small towns can do big things if they have passion“, “Time to “Bee-lieve” in our small communities!” and “Alvinston Community Group celebrates its successes at conference” are some of the headlines used in news stories about the Teeny Tiny Southwest Summit.beesummit

Held on November 15th, 2016, and hosted by the Municipality of Brooke-Alvinston, OMAFRA, Sarnia-Lambton Economic Partnership, and Sarnia-Lambton Business Development Corporation, this event brought together 126 community volunteers, business champions, municipal staff and elected officials to hear ideas about revitalizing small communities.

Continue reading Key Takeaways: Teeny Tiny Southwest Summit

Insights from 1,213 BR+E Surveys

The results for the 2015/16 roll up report are here! We surveyed 1,213 businesses across Ontario, and have aggregated the key findings in an infographic. For clients with ongoing BR+E Projects, the rollup offers a benchmark to measure the success of their own BR+E Project against the Provincial average. In comparison, clients who are interested in starting a project can use the roll up report to help identify an area of focus for their project.

provincial-survey-results

To view the full presentation of the BR+E provincial survey results, see below: